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Revisit Places to Eat In Hudson .. Derry Road Pizza Hut

This week our Revisit series will shift to ‘Places to Eat In Hudson’; beginning with those on Derry Road beginning at the bridge area and working northward. Pizza Hut at 62 Derry Road is the first we come to and the most recent to close it’s doors to business.

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Aerial View Derry Road Near Pizza Hut and Car Wash

For the past few years we have seen changes take place from 62 -68 Derry Road. First with the conversion of the long time idle property of the former Hogan’s Garden Center into the Dollar Tree and O’Reilly Auto Part stores; now with the Pizza Hut property, 62 Derry Road, on the market more changes are in the works.

60 years ago, in 1961, this section of Derry Rad consisted of the home of Roy and Flora L. Griffin at 62 Derry plus undeveloped land at 64 – 68. The Griffins operated Banner Photo of Nashua. Roy passed about 1966 and Flora continued as President and Treasurer of Banner Photo and retained her residence in Hudson.

The first change toward development came about 1959 with the opening of Hogan’s Garden Center and Flower Shoppe at 68 Derry Road. Hogan’s was a popular place for trees, shrubs, garden supplied, and flowers. They remained in business until the early 1980’s. From that time until a few years ago the land and buildings remained idle; including the large green house used by both the garden center and flower shoppe.

In 1978 the site of the Griffin home was purchased by Pizza Hut of America and by 1981 the Pizza Hut Restaurant in Hudson was in operation. Although changes did occur in the corporate ownership and structure of Pizza Hut this restaurant remained in business some 35 years; closing for business within the last year. The property is for sale, so ‘stay tuned’ for further change.

About the same time, 1981, and adjacent to Pizza Hut the Derry Road Car Wash opened for business. Although operating under different names a car wash remains at this location to the present day,

More recently, in 2014, the site of Hogan’s was sold for new development. The first to emerge was the new, stand alone, Dollar Tree in 2015. That was followed soon thereafter by O’Reiley Auto Body in 2016.

As we pull back the layers of time we see the time line of development. Our photo for this week is an aerial of 62 and 64 Derry Road soon after 1981. We see Pizza Hut and Derry Road Car Wash. To the right, and off the photo, was Hogan’s Garden Center and Flower Shoppe. Upon the sale and re-use of the pizza Hut facility we will have the opportunity to watch further changes.

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15 Central Street Future Home of DeSalvo Construction

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C&R Warehouse at 15 Central C1975

The Cumming Brothers began their business in 1882 as a blacksmith and wheelwright shop, later expanding to the manufacture of carriages. With the advent of the auto they transitioned to building truck bodies. This building at what is now 15 Central Street was built about 1930 as a garage and repair shop for their business. In 1950, after the business closed, it was sold to C&R furniture of Nashua and used by them for a warehouse for several years. In 2017, after remaining idle for some time, this 21/2 story wood frame building was purchased by Peter DeSalvo and has been remodeled both inside and out to current building codes. This building will soon be used for the headquarters for the Peter DeSalvo Construction Company. Lets explore the history surrounding this location.

The Cummings Brothers was not the first business on this site nor was it the first blacksmith in Hudson Village near the bridge. About 1842 James Carnes moved to Hudson from Henniker, NH and built his home at the corner of Main Street (now Ferry Street) and Lowell Road (now Central Street) using materials from the old South Meeting house which was located near Blodgett Cemetery on Lowell Road. Using additional materials from the old meeting house he built a store building on the opposite side of Central Street and uphill from his home. He operated a grocery store for some years with little success. About 1851 he closed the grocery and immediately began to manufacture wheelbarrows; later he changed the business to a wheelwright. Unfortunately, by 1859 this building with all contents and tools was destroyed by fire. Mr. Carnes rebuilt re-established the wheelwright business.

In 1882, Willis P. Cummings purchased the shop, tools, and business from James Carnes. He and his younger brother Charles E. became partners in the Cumming Brothers. This was the beginning of a business which expanded and changed with the times until sometime after 1946.

Willis was 32 years of age when he partnered with his 19 year old brother in 1882. He was born 1850 in Lowell, MA the oldest son and child of Hiram and Abby (Clark) Cummings. He came to Hudson at the age of 6 with his parents. He was educated in public schools of Lowell, Hudson, and later at the Nashua Literary Institute.

In 1869, when he was nearly 20 years of age and soon after the completion of the railroad to the Pacific Coast, he went to California to assist his uncle with the supervision of his herd of 10,000 sheep! Willis remained for 2 years and then returned home; after which he established a carpenter and building business at North Chelmsford, MA. In 1873 he married Hattie D. Lawrence, daughter of Hartwell and Sarah (Blood). Their daughter Bertha Ella was born 1875. He moved his family to Hudson in 1876. Meanwhile his uncle in California passed away. At the request of the executor he returned to California in 1877 to assist with settlement of the estate. He returned to Hudson after 3 months.

In 1885 his wife Hattie passed and he married a second time in 1885 to Francis M. Clement. Willis continued with his building business until September 1880 when he established a wheelwright and carriage business near the bridge in Hudson. Then in 1881 he and his younger brother Charles became partners and purchased the wheelwright shop, tools, and lot from James Carnes.

From 1881 until the mid 1940’s the Cumming Brothers operated in Hudson Village; first as a blacksmith and wheelwright and expanding to a carriage manufacturer. When the automobile became of age the business transitioned to the manufacture of truck bodies. Willis P. passed in June 1939 at which time he was the holder of the gold headed Boston Post Cane as the oldest male resident of Hudson. He was particularly proud of this as his father Hiram, some years earlier also held the cane. Following his passing his daughter Bertha (Cummings) Nokes became active along with her uncle, Charles, in the management of the business. Poor health forced Charles to retire from the business in the early 1940’s. By 1948 the Cumming Brothers was no longer in business and in December 1950 the land and buildings of 15 Central was sold to C&R furniture of Nashua. Charles passed in February 1953

C&R Furniture was a three generation, family owned business of the Hebert family with a retail store on Elm Street in Nahsua. They used this building as a warehouse. In 1954 the Hudson Community Church had plans to build a parish house on property they owned between their present building and the driveway to the C&R warehouse. C&R sold a triangular piece of land of about 980 square feet which enabled them to erect the parish house. C&R retained to right to pass over by foot or vehicle, any portion of this piece not used by the church.

Our first photo of the warehouse was taken about 1975.. The building could be entered from the driveway into the first floor. It was also possible to enter the building via a bridge from the high point of the driveway into the second floor.

In March 2017, after a number of years of no-use, the old C&R warehouse was sold by the Herbert family to Peter Desalvo. Since that time the building and driveway have undergone extensive modifications to meet current building codes. Basement walls were restored, original beams were retained but structurally enhanced. The interior has been reconfigured to include a reception area, conference room, office space, and a break room for the employees. The exterior has a new roof, dormers, windows, and siding; all with low maintenance in mind.

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15 Central Street 2018

In recognition of his this project to retrofit and re-purpose this facility of the past, Peter DeSalvo was the recipient of the Third Annual Hudson Historical Society Community and Cultural Service Award. This award was presented to Peter during the Annual Charity Auction to benefit the Historical Society held at the Hills House grounds this past Sunday June 24. Peter and his workmen can be justly proud of the transformation to this building. Desalvo Construction recently passed their 10th anniversary. Peter and his young family reside in Hudson. Our second photo, complements of Zach Piotrowicz (ZMP Photography) shows the 15 Central Street property soon to be home to Peter Desalvo Construction.

Steam Railroad Tracks at Greeley Street

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Greeley Street Crossing Looking West

The steam railroad crossed the Merrimack River into Hudson just south of what is now Veterans Memorial Bridge as you cross from Nashua into Hudson. It then made a path easterly and slightly north through Hudson. The tracks crossed Lowell Road at Central Street and then on to Hudson Center and West Windham. The one railroad station in town was at Hudson Center just off Greeley Street and behind the Town Hall (now Wattannick Hall). In this 1896 photo we are standing on the tracks near the station looking west along the tracks and the Greeley Street crossing. The corner of the station house can just be seen in the right of the photo. Greeley Street is a narrow dirt road and the area on the opposite side of Greeley appears as a wooded area or field. Today there are few reminders of the railroad bed. The area on the left is now the parking lot of the Baptist Church and the area on the right is the Greeley Street playground. Photo from the Society collection and courtesy of Len Lathrop.

 

192 Central Street – The McCoy Home

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The McCoy Home on Central Street

 

This house which stood at 192 Central Street was home to as many as 5 generations of McCoys. The earliest McCoy we find that lived here was James Otis McCoy, born 1788 in Windham, NH. He purchased this location and a corresponding site on the opposite side of the road from Abigail Chase in 1859 when he was 71. Ownership of this homestead passed from James Otis to his grandson James (B:1846), then to Herman Richards (B: 1878) and then to Herman’s daughter and son-in-law,Thelma McCoy Ives and Merrill ‘Joe’ Ives, Herman’s widow, Ethel Augusta Woodward, continued to reside there until she passed in 1968.

The younger James McCoy was born in Boston, MA in 1846 and came to Hudson with his parents, Daniel Gregg and Harriet (Barrett) McCoy, at the age of 6 weeks. By 1856 his father Daniel Gregg passed at the age of 41. James was 10 years old. By 1863, when James was 17, his mother Harriet passed at the age of 51. When he was 19 James enlisted in Company I First NH Heavy Artillery volunteers. Returning to Hudson after his service in the Civil War he purchased the McCoy homestead on Central Street from his grandfather, James Otis, in 1867.

On December 2, 1868 at the age of 21 James and Emma Cinderella Richards were married in Hudson. They lived their 26 years of marriage in this McCoy home. During this time they raised a large family. James passed in January 1915 after a period of poor health. He was survived by six children: James Otis of Manchester; Mary Haselton of Hudson, Herbert W. of Shirley, MA, Herman Richards, Daniel Gregg, and Elgin Leon all of Hudson. He had been predeceased by his wife Emma Cinderella Richards. James was known as a quiet man who was well liked by his fellow townspeople. Of his surviving children Herman, Daniel, and Elgin are significant to the history of 192 Central.

Herman received title to this Central Street home in 1915; 1/3 by will from his father James; 1/3 from his brother Elgin; and 1/3 from his brother Daniel. In October 1916 at the age of 37 Herman and Ethel Augusta Woodward were married in Nashua. Herman and Ethel made their home in the house where he was born. They raised a family of 2 daughters, Mildred (b:1918) and Thelma (b: 1925) and 1 son, Robert (b:1922). Mildred married and moved to Nashua. Robert moved to Illinois. Thelma married Merrill “Joe” Ives and they remained local.

Herman was employed with B&M Railroad, Maine Manufacturing, and later with Beede Ruber Co. For many years he served as superintendent and secretary of Westview Cemetery which was located adjacent to the rear of his house. His widow, Ethel, continued to reside here until she passed in February 1968. Thelma and “Joe” Ives purchased the McCoy home and resided there until the time of their divorce when it was sold to John C. Graichen who resided there for several years. Following the passing of Mr. Graichen it was sold to the family of Michael Dumont and later to his son Donald. Our photo of the house was taken by the author in 2010, following several years where the house was unoccupied. Soon after this photo was taken the building was razed. The lot at 192 remains vacant to this day. Thelma (McCoy) Ives remarried to Al Carroll. Thelma Carroll passed in 2017.

It is difficult to determine when this house was built. We do know there was a dwelling on the property when it was purchased by the McCoy family in 1859 from Abigail Chase. Prior ownership has been traced through various owners to Paul Tenney in 1834 at which time there was also a dwelling on the property.

 

Revisit Hudson’s Railroad Station in the Center

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Hudson’s Busy Railroad Station

Here we see Hudson’s railroad station in it;s original position slightly off Greeley Street and behind the Town Hall (now Wattannick Hall). This station was used as a dwelling and later moved onto the Benson’s property. After many years of no use the station exterior has been restored and can be seen just inside the entrance to Bensons Park.

In this 1896 photo, we are looking east from the Greeley Street crossing at the Hudson Center Station (left) and the rear of the Town Hall (now Wattannick Hall) on the right. From this point the tracks are headed towards the crossing at Windham Road, on to the crossing at Clement Road and then to West Windham. A Post Office was established in this station in 1876 and Eli Hamblet was the Postmaster; a position he held until his death in 1896. It was at this station that animals and patrons arrived to go to Benson’s. Animals were shipped here and some were walked along the road to the farm. The Jungle Train from Boston brought people on excursions. There was a freight house (center right) and siding for handling goods. At the height of railroad traffic there were as many as 13 passenger trains plus freight activity each day on this line. Considering a single track line, this made for a very busy and dangerous section of the line. The railroad station was later made into a dwelling, but when it was no longer in use it was moved to Benson Park and can still be seen there. Photograph from the Historical Society Collection.

 

Baptist Church Sanctuary

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Sanctuary C 1888

When the Baptist Meeting House in Hudson Center was built in 1841 it included four walls with windows on probably three sides, a balcony, chimney, one or two wood burning stoves, a platform, a pulpit set, and pews.  The pews were of the square box type and had been carried over from the North Meeting House.  Pews were individually owned and passed down by deed. Likely the balcony was open overlooking the sanctuary and enclosed later to conserve heat.  You may ask about the steeple.  It was part of the early building as evidenced by the bell.  The first bell, donated by Deacon Moses Greeley,  cracked and was replaced in 1847 by the present bell.  At first stringed instruments were used to provide the music.  They were replaced by a pump organ about 1850.  At that time a young doctor in town, Dr. David O. Smith, also served as music director for the church.
Various modifications to the sanctuary have occurred since 1841, but the most notable of these occurred in 1888 when the church received the gift of the Woodbury and Harris tracker organ from Dr. David O. Smith.  In order to house this organ an alcove was added to the front of the sanctuary.  At the same time extensive changes to modernize the sanctuary were made.
The new organ became the centerpiece of the sanctuary with the large archway for the pipes and the console for the organist.  Behind the scenes were doors through which one could enter into the organ.  The doorway on the left side was most important.  As the church did not have electricity a ‘blow boy’ would enter into the organ in order to exercise the pump handle to place air into the organ pipes.  This practice continued into the 1920’s when the organ was electrified.
Other improvements included colored glass windows, a new pulpit set, an updated platform, and new modern pews.  These pews were said to be of the newest type available at the time.  The pulpit set,  windows, and pews are a part of the sanctuary at the present time.  The platform has had various minor changes made to it through the years.  Our first photo show the interior of the church sanctuary C 1888 shortly after the dedication of the new organ and the re-dedication of the sanctuary in April 1888.  Lighting was done by gas; note the center chandelier in the sanctuary.  Also the ceiling is not the steel ceiling of today; this was added about 1905.
Before we ‘fast forward’ to the present time let me make a comment about baptisms.    Prior to 1900 there was no baptistery within the church.  Baptisms occurred at a local lake; Ottarnic or Robinson Pond.  Our church has had 3 baptistries.  The first installed about 1900 and the third C1965 to the left of the organ as a memorial to Deacon Arthur M. Smith.  The mural for the baptistery was painted by Phyllis Moore.
For the past 10 plus years the church at Hudson Center has engaged in a number of building improvements; some of which paved the way for more visible renovations to the sanctuary.  The earliest of these was the replacement of the steeple.  The original steeple was removed in 2000 and for many years we were without a steeple.  As funds and an able contractor became available the steeple was replaced in 2006.  The second major improvement came with the restoration of  the colored sanctuary windows; again as money became available each window was removed, restored, and returned to it’s original place.  The third improvement was to upgrade our heating system and the installation of central air for the sanctuary.  These improvements were completed in 2014.
With these infrastructural items completed it became possible to plan for more visual enhancements to the sanctuary. A Sanctuary Refurbishment committee was organized by the congregation.  The first project is to update and enlarge the platform.  After a planning period and architectural drawing of the proposed platform, see photo,  construction work began  In February 2018.  The goals are to enlarge and modernize the platform, improve access to it and the organ console, and to make sure it was structurally sound.  The construction work is being done by volunteers from the church and the community under the leadership of Richard Tassi as the architect.
FBC platform 2018

Proposed Platform 2018

Follow-on projects will include painting of walls and ceiling, lighting, flooring, and more comfortable seating.  The schedule for these projects is open and will be planned when resources are available.
The Baptist Church in Hudson Center has served our community and our Lord for over 200 years.  The building at 236 Central Street is an historic building.   It is interesting and important that while making these plans for the future we are able to reflect on our past.

Revisit Hudson Center …Town House Hudson Center

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Town House Hudson Center

This Town House was the second building on this site. The first was the North Meeting House used by the Presbyterians as early as 1771; later shared with the Baptists. By 1811 ownership of the land and buildings were conveyed to the Baptist Society. The pews were not involved in the transaction as they were privately owned. After the Baptist Meeting House was built in 1841 this property was transferred to the Town of Hudson.
In 1857 Hudson contracted with William Anderson of Windham to erect this Town House on the site of the Old North Meeting House in Hudson Center. The North Meeting House was deeded to the town by the Baptist Society after The Baptist Church was completed in 1841. Town meetings were held here until the mid 1930’s when there was a desire among the town people to hold meetings at the bridge area. Wattannick Grange held their meetings here from its organization. In 1963 the town authorized the sale of the building to Wattannick Grange. To the right of the Town House is Harvey Lewis’ Coal Grain and Grocery; on the left and rear is the B&M Railroad Depot. Today, now that Hudson and Wattannick Granges have merged, this building is known as Wattannick Hall the home of Hudson Grange No 11. Photo from the Historical Society collection.

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