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Hudson Center Revisited

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This series on Hudson History began in August 2014 as a joint project between the Historical Society and the HLN as a way of sharing some of Hudson’s history with our readers.  To date there have been some 170 weekly articles and accompanying photos published in the paper and on RememberHudsonNHWhen.com.  I enjoy writing these articles and the research necessary to prepare for them.
 
Going forward there are still many sites and topics to write about. But, more time is now needed to do this research.  My plan going forward is to submit  Remember Hudson When articles every other week.  And, on the alternative weeks we will Revisit parts of town by re-printing articles from the past on a theme basis:  for example a Pre 1970 trip down Lowell Road or Restaurants in town, etc.  This week we begin a Revisit series on Hudson Center.
 
As always if there is  some historical site or photo you would like me to consider writing about, please contact Ruth via the HLN or the Hudson Historical Society by sending email to HudsonHistorical@live.com or a phone message at 603-880-2020.
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Prior to 1834 the only village in town was a small one around the Hudson Center Common.  This  consisted of three stores, a tavern, the north meeting house, one practicing doctor, the post office, and 8 or 9 residences. By 1888 the  Baptist Church sanctuary was built; the north meeting house was replaced by the town hall, and the only railroad station in town existed behind the town hall and off Greeley Street.  This C1888  photo of the Hudson Center Common shows the view from the home of Eli Hamblet  on Hamblet Avenue.
 
Straight ahead is the Baptist Church. The church where he was elected as deacon just a few years earlier in 1882.  The large vestry at the rear of the church had not been built, but I am certain the need for it had been discussed among the members.  To the right of the church is the home of Mrs. Mahalia Greeley; the widow of John Greeley, MD. Further to the right, not shown on this photo, is the town hall.   To the left of the church is the former home of Reuben Greeley, postmaster from 1818 until 1829; now occupied by his son Daniel Greeley.  Daniel was known to have a good nature and was well liked within the community.  
 
In the foreground and on the left of the photo is the Old Hudson Center Cemetery.  Up until a few years prior to this photo the cemetery was in disrepair and the town considered moving the remains from this site so that the size of the common could be increased.  This proposal did NOT meet with public sentiment and, as it turned out, a former resident of Hudson, John Foster, made a proposal to the town that he would build a stone fence and clean up the cemetery if the town would maintain it.  Immediately beyond the cemetery is a roof of a barn; possible from the barn connected to the Paul Tenney/Henry Brown House on the opposite side of the common.  Photo from the Historical Society Collection.
 
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2 Comments

  1. Stephen Kopiski says:

    Thank you Ruth, looking forward to your new stories and enjoying the older ones again. Good luck.

    Like

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