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The Senter Homestead on Old Derry Road

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Thomas Senter Home S

Senter Farmhouse Old Derry Road

Best known as the home of Deacon Thomas Senter this  farm was home to five generations of the Senter Family, beginning with Samuel the father of Thomas.  The farm were settled in the South West part of Londonderry near “Potash” Corner.  This was the part of Londonderry annexed to Nottingham West in 1778.  We know the location today as the intersection of Old Derry Road with Robinson Road and a bit north of the Senter Cemetery.
Deacon Thomas was born May 1753 in Londonderry, NH the son of Susan Taylor and Samuel Senter.  Thomas married Esther Greeley, daughter of Ezekiel Greeley, circa 1775.  Their family consisted of 7 daughters (Kate, Bridget, Susan, Charlotte, Esther, Rebecca, and Nancy) and 2 sons (Thomas, Jr and Charles).  His wife, Esther passed at the age of 51 in 1800.  Thomas married a second time to Mercy Jackson and a third time to Eunice White.  There is no record of children born to these later marriages.  Thomas was a farmer and he enlisted in the spring of 1775 for 8 months and served at the Battle of Bunker Hill.
On May 1, 1805 the  Baptist Church of Christ of Nottingham West (now the First Baptist Church of Hudson) was organized in this home by a  council called for that purpose.  The new  church consisted of 65 members who had been “sett Off” from the Baptist Church in Londonderry.   That very same  council held an ordination for  The Reverend Thomas Paul.  For several years following the new church did not have a settled pastor.  The pulpit was supplied by various pastors, one of whom was the Reverend Thomas Paul.  The early church had two deacons.  Thomas Senter was chosen as one of the deacons, the other was Moses Greeley.  The anniversary of the organization of the Baptist Church (now at 236 Central Street) is recognized annually on or near May 1 as a Roll Call.  Members meet, enjoy a meal, fellowship, and call the roll.  When a member’s name is called they respond with a verse of scripture.
 This homestead remained with the Senter family until May 1889 when it was sold to Jeremiah Heath and  his son George M. Heath.  The Heath family owned the place until about 1921 when it was sold by Cora Heath, wife of George.  Either just before or soon after being sold by the Heath family the ancient home was destroyed by fire.  It is not clear if this was an intentional burn or not.  From the June 30, 1921 article in the Nashua Telegraph we get a description of the house.  The centerpiece of the house were two large brick chimneys probably made from Litchfield bricks.  These massive structures remained standing after the fire; showing the huge arches in the  cellar which supported 8 fireplaces.  One for each of the rooms in the house.  Cooking was done in an open fireplace.  The house had a front and a back door which led into a hallway from which one you access any of the four rooms downstairs.  The roof timbers were unusually strong and could have supported the extra weight of a slate roof.  To my knowledge, all evidence of this house has been replaced by more recent developments.
While researching Moses Greeley for last week’s article and Thomas Senter for this week, I began to understand the significant role each of these gentlemen had  to our town’s history; and the similarities of their lives.  Let me share:  They were farmers and neighbors, settling on the Derry Road.  They had adjacent farms and their houses were within 1/2 mile of each other.   They were both charter members of the First Baptist Church and both were elected as one of the two deacons for the church; a position held for life or until one resigned.  They were not related but their lives and the lives of their families were interwoven.  You see, Moses and Thomas married sisters.  Moses’ first wife was Hannah Greeley.  Thomas’ first wife was Esther Greeley.  These ladies were the daughters of Ezekiel Greeley.  The relationship between these two families continued beyond Moses and Thomas.
This photo of the Senter Homestead is courtesy of John Senter of Nashua; a direct descendant of Deacon Thomas Senter.
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